ABS21385

Untargeted metabolite profiling of the response of perennial ryegrass to cold stress using UHPLC-QTOF-MS.



Nadia Lamari*
UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science, UCD Centre for Plant Science, and UCD Earth Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland

Lena Förster
UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland
Teagasc, Crops Environment and Land Use Programme, Oak Park Research Centre, Carlow, Ireland

Thibauld Michel
Teagasc, Crops Environment and Land Use Programme, Oak Park Research Centre, Carlow, Ireland

Susanne Barth
Teagasc, Crops Environment and Land Use Programme, Oak Park Research Centre, Carlow, Ireland

Carl K-Y. Ng
UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science, UCD Centre for Plant Science, and UCD Earth Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland

*Presenting Author


Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is a major cool-season forage grass that is widely cultivated in temperate regions because it exhibits rapid growth and establishment. Additionally, it possesses high forage quality, which is important for dairy and meat production. Temperature is a major determinant of perennial ryegrass growth in the South of Ireland, with productivity highest in late spring and early summer. However, our understanding of the metabolic reprogramming associated with cold stress exposure in perennial ryegrass is still rudimentary. To advance our understanding of the responses of perennial ryegrass to cold stress, we subjected plants to growth conditions mimicking a very cool Irish spring day (8° C during the day and 2° C at night). Control plants were grown in temperatures of 15° C during the day and 8° C at night. We used liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) of semi-polar extracts to determine the extent of cold-stress induced reprogramming of secondary metabolism in leaves of various perennial ryegrass accessions and to identify the putative metabolic markers for cold stress responses in perennial ryegrass.