ABS55513

Oscillating long non-coding RNAs target the CDF family of transcription factors


  • Oral Presentation
  • Plant Genetics and Evolution
  • 13 Jun 2018 09:20
  • FS-G01, UCD Agriculture and food science Centre
  • View all IPSAM abstracts

Camila Sanch├ęz-Retuerta
Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) CSIC-IRTA-UAB-UB, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain

Marc Boix
Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) CSIC-IRTA-UAB-UB, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain

Rossana Henriques*
Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) CSIC-IRTA-UAB-UB, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain
School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Distillery Fields, North Mall, Cork, Ireland
Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Lee Road, Cork, Ireland

*Presenting Author


The circadian clock is an internal timekeeper that allows organisms to adjust to 24h days. This anticipation mechanism provides a competitive advantage by controlling fitness and biomass. The clock perceives environmental cues (inputs) and translates them into rhythms that will ultimately regulate critical biological processes (outputs). Among clock controlled events are hypocotyl growth, petal and leaf daily movements, responses to abiotic and biotic stress and flowering time. We have previously identified long non-protein coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are regulated by the circadian clock. LncRNAs are RNAs longer than 200 nt that lack protein coding potential. Although their study in plants is limited, they have been implicated in developmental regulation, immunity and disease in animals. These transcripts can arise from intergenic regions, introns, or be natural antisense transcripts (NATs) to either protein coding genes or other lncRNAs. Our screening approach revealed several lncRNAs that were NATs to members of the CDF (CYCLING DOF FACTOR) family of transcriptional regulators. CDFs are important inhibitors of photoperiodic flowering due to their direct repression of CO (CONSTANS) and FT (FLOWERING LOCUS T), two positive regulators of this process. CDFs were also implicated in several abiotic stress responses, suggesting a broader function for these proteins. Our findings indicate that lncRNAs are able to target several CDFs and thus affect their function. We could show that FLORE (CDF5 LONG NON-CODING RNA) negatively regulates CDF5 and promotes flowering. Here we show how this regulation could also affect stress responses. Moreover, we will present our recent results on a new NAT pair including lncCDF1 and CDF1. Our ultimate goal is to understand the biological relevance of these circadian-regulated lncRNAs and extend these analyses to other relevant species with agronomic value.