ABS65509

Response of a large perennial ryegrass panel towards cold conditions


  • Oral Presentation
  • Agriculture and Soil Science
  • 11 Jun 2018 16:25
  • FS-G01, UCD Agriculture and food science Centre
  • View all IPSAM abstracts

Lena Forster
Teagasc Crops Research Centre, Crops, Environment & Land Use Programme, Oak Park, Carlow, R93 XE12
UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science and 3UCD Earth Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin

Jim Grant
Teagasc Research Operations Group, Statistics and Applied Physics Department, Ashtown, Dublin 15

Thibauld Michel
Teagasc Crops Research Centre, Crops, Environment & Land Use Programme, Oak Park, Carlow, R93 XE12

Carl Ng
UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science
UCD Earth Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4

Susanne Barth*
Teagasc Crops Research Centre, Crops, Environment & Land Use Programme, Oak Park, Carlow, R93 XE12

*Presenting Author


Perennial ryegrass is the most important forage grass in Irish agriculture. An extension of the growing season in Ireland in spring and autumn is a breeding target to make farming more profitable since a grass-fed diet based on grazing is the cheapest way of nutrition for ruminants. Fifty-seven perennial ryegrass accessions were screened for their ability to grow under typical Irish spring conditions as taken from long term temperature records in controlled climate chambers. They were grown in low temperature (8°C/2°C day/night) and control conditions (15°C/8°C day/night) in three consecutive independent experiments. Fresh weight, height, chlorophyll content and electrolyte leakage were measured, and these parameters were used to rank plant performance under low temperature growth conditions. Height, yield and electrolyte leakage were excellent measures for the impact of cold stress on performance under cold conditions. Accessions differed little in growth under cold stress.  Interestingly, the various genotypes responded differentially to more amenable control conditions, indicating that a quick response to more amenable growth conditions is a better target for breeding programs compared to low temperature tolerance.