ABS67372

Crop Salinity Tolerance Induction Using Novel Biostimulants (SALTIBIO)


  • Poster Presentation
  • Poster 13 (Flash Talk: 11 Jun 2018 14:52)
  • Foyer, UCD Agriculture and food science Centre
  • View all IPSAM abstracts

Elomofe Ikuyinminu*
Plant Biostimulant Group, Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Institute of Technology Tralee, Clash, Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

Oscar Goñi
Plant Biostimulant Group, Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Institute of Technology Tralee, Clash, Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

Shane O’Connell
Plant Biostimulant Group, Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre, Institute of Technology Tralee, Clash, Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland.

*Presenting Author


The United Nations’ and Agriculture Organization predicts that by 2050 the world will need to produce 70 percent more food than it does currently. Along with improving food storage and transport, increasing crop yields is seen as a primary solution. Salinity is one of the major environmental stresses affecting crop production, particularly in arid and semi-arid areas. Most of the vegetable crops are salt sensitive, growing poorly in salinized soils due to the accumulation of toxic ions from prolonged irrigation regimes. A meaningful approach to increase crop yield and counteract salt stress would be the use of protein hydrolysate-based biostimulants, which are gaining interest worldwide. The aim of this research is the development of an innovative system to produce protein hydrolysates from lentil and sesame seeds with the ability to biostimulate plant tolerance to salt stress. Novel protein hydrolysates were produced using a cocktail of suitable proteases. A full compositional analysis of protein hydrolysates (soluble protein, aminogram) and determination of molecular mass profiles was carried out to gain further understanding of their molecular structural variation. The initial biostimulant activity screening of plant protein hydrolysates was carried out using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana under unstressed and salt-stressed conditions in a high-throughput root microphenotyping system. Experiments were carried out with different concentration rates of different protein hydrolysates and treatments were assessed by comparing phenotypical parameters and plant pigment concentration (chlorophyll and carotenoids). Positive treatments from this initial screening were assessed for their effect on flowering and crop yield of tomato plants (cv. Micro-Tom) subjected to controlled salinity conditions. Future research work will be assessed to investigate specific markers involved in salt stress tolerance in A. thaliana and tomato plants (cell membrane integrity, osmoprotectants, stress proteins, hormone signalling).