ABS74693

Development of Molecular markers for Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance breeding in wheat


  • Poster Presentation
  • Poster 18 (Flash Talk: 11 Jun 2018 17:07)
  • Foyer, UCD Agriculture and food science Centre
  • View all IPSAM abstracts

Keshav Bahadur Malla*
Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, UCD Science Centre- East, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland

Ganesh Thapa
Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, UCD Science Centre- East, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland

Hermann Buerstmayr
BOKU- University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Department of Agrobiotechnology Tulln, 3430 Tulln, Austria

Sebastien Praud
Biogemma, 5 rue Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois, 75001 Paris, France

Simon Berry
Limagrain UK Ltd, Rothwell, Market Rasen, Lincolnshire, LN7 6DT, United Kingdom

Fiona Doohan
Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, UCD Science Centre- East, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland

*Presenting Author


Fusarium head blight (FHB), primarily caused by the fungus Fusarium graminearum, is an economically important disease of wheat resulting in reduced yields and grain contaminated with mycotoxins, rendering unfit for consumption by humans and animals. Many FHB resistance QTLs have been genetically mapped and in our lab, several genes responsive to FHB and mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) have been functionally characterized. These include a cytochrome P450, a receptor kinase, the Pooideae-specific gene TaFROG, and Ta-FROG-interacting proteins such as TaNAC5. Wheat consists of three sub genomes (A, B and D) and the objective of this project is to determine whether varietal-specific differences within these FHB/DON responsive genes and/or their promoter region are associated with FHB resistance in the field. Gene expression studies were conducted using homoeolog-specific primers, which confirmed that the homoeologs were differentially expressed in response to FHB infection and the toxigenic Fusarium virulence factor (DON). Sequence analysis of the coding and promoter regions has revealed sequence differences that could, potentially, underlie these observed expression differences. On-going studies are identifying homoeolog and genotype–specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in conserved domains and the promoters of these FHB/DON-responsive genes. These SNPs will be converted to high-throughput KASP assays and used to genotype the Remus x CM82036 doubled haploid population, which has been scored for FHB infection over several site and seasons. QTL analysis will then be conducted to determine which SNPs are associated with FHB resistance in the field. Significantly associated SNP markers will then be used for marker–assisted selection (MAS) for FHB resistance breeding.