ABS84897

Isolation of Zymoseptoria tritici protocol in wheat to improve genomic prediction models


  • Poster Presentation
  • Poster 4 (Flash Talk: 11 Jun 2018 14:43)
  • Foyer, UCD Agriculture and food science Centre
  • View all IPSAM abstracts

Eoghan Curran*
UCD School of Agriculture and Food Science University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Jimmy Burke
UCD School of Agriculture and Food Science University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Angela Feechan
UCD School of Agriculture and Food Science University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Julio Isidro-Sánchez
UCD School of Agriculture and Food Science University College Dublin Belfied, Dublin 4, Ireland.

*Presenting Author


The main objectives of this study are to isolate Zymoseptoria tritici races, causal agent of Septoria tritici Blotch (STB) from infected wheat leaves, and to examine if genomic prediction models can be improved by including genomic information from both host and pathogen. The material used in this study was derived from STB-infected wheat leaves from four different locations across the UK. Infected leaves from between 31-42 cultivars from each environment were collected. An average of 2 leaves per cultivar were used for the Z. tritici isolation. The isolation protocol used was a modified version of Eyal 1987. Briefly, two 4-5 cm sections of a leaf were cut and attached to microscope slides. Each slide was placed on a filter paper inside a petri dish, the filter paper pre-moistened with sterile water. The dish was double sealed with parafilm and placed in an incubator for 22 hours. Between 15-27 isolates of Z. tritici have been collected from each environment. These isolates will be used to create a site-specific inoculum from each environment that will be sprayed on a wheat panel to test for resistance. Z. tritici isolates and the wheat varieties will be genotyped by next generation sequencing. A polytunnel experiment is currently underway at Rosemount Environmental Research Station with 200 cultivars in a randomized complete block design with 2 repetitions and 5 checks. The inoculum will be sprayed at growth stage 39 (Zadoks) and the disease scored 30 days post inoculation. This scoring will follow the percentage of whole leaf area displaying disease symptoms. The phenotypic and genotypic information from both host and pathogen will be used to build the predictive model. We expect an increase in genomic prediction accuracy by including Z.tritici genotypic information in the model. We would like to acknowledge Origin Enterprises-SFI for funding this research.